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Sightseeing
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Takamatsu History Museum

Takamatsu History Museum

Here, the history of Takamatsu is introduced chronologically from the ancient primitive to the modern present. Along with numerous displays are Tamura Shrine's votive objects designated as important cultural properties as well as the model of "Hiru-maru", the ship owned by Takamatsu.

Access
  • [O] 9:00-17:00
  • [C] Mondays,12/28-1/3
  • [A] 5 min walk from JR Syowacho Stn.
  • [TEL] 087-861-4520
  • [Address] 1-2-20 Showa-cho Takamatsu City

Stone Museum (Ishi no minzoku shiryokan)

Stone Museum (Ishi no minzoku shiryokan)

The Stone Museum is located in Mure town where the world famous Aji stones are produced. You can see the knowledge and techniques as well as the superb skills of masons here. In the museum, scenes of cutting, carrying and processing stones from the end of Taisho period to the beginning of Showa period are duplicated using dioramas with life-size dolls. There is a grass field outside where children can play  and Over 1000 items which had been used by masons at that time are displayed for you to touch and hold.

Access
  • [O] 9:00-17:00
  • [C] Mondays
  • [A] 15 min walk from Kotoden Yakuri Stn.
  • [TEL] 087-845-8484
  • [Address] 1810 Mure Mure-cho Takamatsu City

Sanuki Takamatsu Festival

Sanuki Takamatsu Festival 1 Sanuki Takamatsu Festival 2


The Sanuki Takamatsu Festival is one of the major summer events in Takamatsu, held for three days from August 12 to 14 every year.
Numerous beautiful and colorful fireworks illuminate the night skies of Takamatsu during the firework festival called "Dondon Takamatsu."
The dancing parade is held on the final day of the spectacular mid-summer festival, with more than 4000 dancers dancing enthusiastically along Main Street, enchanting crowds of people.

[Periods for holding]
12th - 14th August

Hyoge Festival

Hyoge Festival

Many people say the origin of this festival was to praise the achievement of Heiroku Yanobe who constructed a new pond to resolve the water shortage during the Edo period; to appreciate water and its good fortune; and to pray for a good harvest.  
Participants put on swords which are made of sliced pumpkins with an aroid stem. They parade in the town coloring their faces with bright red and blue paints.

[Periods for holding]
2nd Sunday, September

Takamatsu Winter Festival

Takamatsu Winter Festival

This festival is the signature winter event in Takamatsu.
During the festival, many joyful events such as children's performance and dance contests are held in Central Park, the event site.
The park is filled with beautiful illuminations and a fantastic atmosphere, enchanting everyone there.

[Periods for holding]
Mid Deoember to Christmas eve

Takamatsu Autumn Festival
/Bussyozan Daimyo Festival

Bussyozan Daimyo Festival

This festival replicates the scene of a Takamatsu feudal lord visiting his family temple, Honenji. This festival is held every year to spread the tradition of Bussyozan town which prospered as a temple town for many years and still has old streets and buildings.
People act as samurai or princesses wearing kimonos from that time and parade around the town.  Fireworks take place at Heike.

[Periods for holding]
Sat. and Sun. in late October

Stone Lantern Promenade

An old Genpei Battlefield Bathed in Mystical Light

Every year from early August to mid-September, approximately two hundred stone lanterns line the one kilometer pathway from Kotoden Yakuri Station to Komatate Iwa, bathing the night in a mystical light at this battlesite from the Genpei War.

Bonsai

Bonsai

Nature Encapsulated

It is said that cultivation of bonsai trees started in Takamatsu during the Edo period, when local people dug up pine trees growing on the coast of the Seto Inland Sea and replanted them in pots. This was the start of bonsai in Takamatsu City. Today, bonsai are one of the representative products of Kagawa prefecture, and the production volume in Kinashi and Kokubunji of pine bonsai are number one in the country. This cultivation technique has spread all over the world, supported by its numerous fans. Among the many types of pine bonsai, Kuro-matsu (black pine), Nishiki-matsu (corkbark pine), Goyo-matsu (Japanese white pine), and Aka-matsu (Japanese red pine) are four representative types. Kuro-matsu is called the king of pine bonsai. The species is named for the black color of its trunk. The trunk, and the long, straight needles project a powerful beauty that has attracted a great number of admirers. Nishiki-matsu is the pine bonsai that launched mass bonsai production. The most interesting feature of this pine is the unique bark on the trunk. The rough, almost frothing quality of the bark fascinates people who see it. Goyo-matsu has needles that come in bunches of five, just like a human hand. The red color of the trunk gives aka-matsu its name. While aka-matsu resembles kuro-matsu in many ways, it has a more delicate silhouette.

Aji-ishi Stone

Mure-cho and Aji-cho are located at the base of Mt. Gokenzan. This is where aji-ishi stone is produced. Aji-ishi stone has a number of distinctive qualities, including its remarkable hardness. It is also said that even after two hundred years, words carved into an aji-ishi stone can still be read, and the stone does not lose its luster. The biggest feature of this stone, is how the more it is polished, the more it sparkles, and a unique black and white speckled pattern emerges. Of all the kinds of stone in the world, his pattern can only be seen in aji-ishi, and because of its rarity and special qualities, it is also known as diamond granite.

Botaori (textile)

Botaori (textile)

Botaori was developed by a weaver from Kyoto who was invited by Takamatsu feudal lord in the early Edo period, around the end of the 17th century. The name Botaori (hold-many textile) is derived from its ability to "hold many years." It is light and feels soft so it has been used for kimonos, summer kimonos and wrapping cloths through the ages.  Recently, it is used for daily shirts, blouses and handkerchiefs.

Kagawa Lacquer Ware

Kagawa Lacquer Ware

Lacquer ware is a traditional craftwork existing from ancient times in Japan. The sap from lacquer trees creates a unique shininess and texture widely loved as a unique Japanese beauty. Here in Takamatsu, Kagawa Lacquer Ware has been observed as a national treasure.

Kinma
This is the method of engraving lines of patterns onto a bowl then putting colored lacquer in the gap.  After drying, it is polished. The gorgeous patterns are said to be the king of Kagawa Lacquer Ware.
Choshitsu (engraving lacquer)
This is the method of coating several layers of lacquers onto a surface then engraving it with a knife to bring out the color you would like to appear creating beautiful line patterns. It is widely known with interiors.
Zonsei
This is the method of drawing patterns on the surface of black or red finished lacquer ware using different colors of lacquer.  Main lines and main parts of a picture are then carved with a knife, and very fine lines are carved to finish up.
It is popular for furnishing goods and daily goods such as containers used to keep tea tools; as well as serving trays.
Zokoku-nuri (Zokoku coating method)
This is the method of coating a surface with lacquer several times, and then putting powder made from makomo, a gramineous plant that grows near the water, to finish it up. It is used for saucers, teacups and trays; and it gains elegance as you use it.
Goto-nuri(Goto coating method)
This is the method of coating a surface twice. A second coat of lacquer with a little bit of color is added to the red lacquer to give a look of elegance. It is then coated with a transparent lacquer to finish it up. This method of lacquer is often used for low tables which become more elegant as time passes.

Hokosan

Hokosan

Hokosan is a Japanese paper doll modeled after Omakisan who sacrificed herself for a princess with a serious illness. It was one of the things to bring as a charm against sickness at the time of a marriage. It has a lovely, innocent face loved by many people. Small dolls are bought as souvenirs by tourists.

Sanuki Kokubunji Temple Remains Museum

Get a Sense of Ancient Kokubunji

Long ago, in the Tempyo era (730s AD) the Sanuki Kokubunji Temple was built. At the Sanuki Kokubunji Temple Remains Museum, visitors can get a sense for the grand spendor of the original Kokubunji temple. It is located directly beside present-day Kokubunji, the 80th temple in the Shikoku 88 Temple Pilgrimage.
This facility features a model of the main building, and a display of objects that have been unearthed from the grounds, as well as a stone model of Sanuki Kokubunji in one tenth of actual size, allowing visitors to get a sense of the Kokubunji of ancient times.

Access
  • [O] 9:00-16:30
  • [C] Mondays
  • [A] 5 min walk from JR Kokubu Stn.
  • [TEL] 087-874-8840
  • [Address] 2177-1 Kokubu Kokubunji-cho Takamatsu City

Kikuchi Kan Memorial Museum

A Place to Encounter a Great Literary Figure

The manuscripts and personal effects of Kikuchi Kan, a local literary legend, are on display here. Images that show his interactions with other literary giants of his time and a reconstruction of his writing room are on display, allowing visitors to get a sense of the magnitude of his literary achievements.
Kikuchi Kan's books, and books that have received one of the two literary prizes founded by Kikuchi, the Akutagawa and Naoki, are available to read in the reading corner.

Access
  • [O] 9:00-17:00
  • [C] Mondays,12/29-1/3
  • [A] 5 min walk from JR Syowacho Stn.
  • [TEL] 087-861-4502
  • [Address] 1-2-20 Showa-cho Takamatsu City

Takamatsu City Museum of Art

A Transmission Point for Art and Culture

The Takamatsu City Museum of Art was built in 1988, in the center of the city (Konya-machi). Since then, through a number of activities such as special exhibits and museum concerts, it has become a transmission point for Takamatsu's art and culture. It has also become a place for the citizens of the city to learn together through lifelong learning programs.
At the Takamatsu City Museum of Art, local artworks such as fine lacquerware pieces, as well as modern paintings and sculptures by well-known artists from within Japan and abroad are displayed.

Access
  • [O] 9:30-19:00(Weekend and holiday 9:30-17:00)
  • [C] Mondays,12/29-1/3
  • [A] 10 min walk from Kotoden Kataharamachi Stn.
  • [TEL] 087-823-1711
  • [Address] 10-4 Konyamachi Takamatsu City
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